analog vs digital photography

analog vs digital photography

analog vs digital photography

Recently a colleague and friend brought to my attention the work of the photographer Chris McCaw and his series Sunburn. There are two reasons why I share my thought on his work here with You - One, I really like the tremendous physicality of these images. The images have more to do with sculpture than photography. (The image as an physical object, as opposed to pure image) Secondly - it's interesting to start looking at this work, and similar, as a re-action against the digital process and try to figure out where photography possibly might be heading. Jörg Colberg | Conscientious wrote a piece - Photography after Photography - in 2012 and to me this is still the best writing on the future of photography that I have come across. What is striking is that still 3 years later it seems that analog photography - and particularly photography heavily based on the ritual of of making a photography is still very intriguing to many. Heck - there is even a sort of holy smoke emerging from Chris McCaw's enormous DIY camera as the sun is burning holes in the medium. In AmericanPhoto John Mahoney is giving some context to the Black Sun phenomeneon - simply put, the light of the sun is so strong that the exposure is more than the medium can handle and the image of the sun gets flipped around (or in McCaws case - the medium starts to burn) This process is called overexposure solarisation.  

The Ritual of Photography

The act, or ritual, of making the photograph seems to have a very big impact on how the final work is being perceived. An image that has a laborious and low-tech birthing process is received differently than an image who lacks those romantic beginnings. The examples are endless, Building your own pinhole camera, re-discovering age-old "forgotten" techniques, Digital has none of that...

Interview Chris McCaw

 
Photography fashion | Modefotografie Berlin